Tag Archives: History

Grade 4 Visits California Pioneer Museum

Grade 4 recently visited Her Side of the Story: Tales of Pioneer Women, the newest exhibit at the Society of California Pioneers.

Among the treasures in The Society of California Pioneers archives are rare, first person narratives by pioneer women. After uniting to ensure that future generations could recognize, and would acknowledge, the role women played in the formation of the state, The Association of Pioneer Women of California collected and preserved the experiences of its members. Bound in an unpublished, handwritten book, their remarkable stories are the foundation of this museum exhibition and online resource for teachers.

Grade 4 Social Studies curriculum delves into American History and Geography, Westward Expansion, and History from the Female Perspective, making the excursion a wonderful fit with our studies.

To learn more about the exhibit, please visit: https://www.californiapioneers.org/museum/

Jan Micha Influential Women in History Project (Grade 4)

“To know the women who came before us is to know ourselves. It is to know the blood memory that runs through our veins. It is to know that the unlived dreams of our ancestors are our honor and our duty to live out, right now. Because right now, as women and as girls, when it comes to the work of the women before us, we may not be able to pay it back, but we can certainly pay it forward.” -Cleo Wade

For over 30 years Grade 4 Hamlin students have taken the stage in front of their peers and parents, giving voice to inspiring women who came before them. This project was started by a beloved Hamlin teacher Jan Micha, and is now named after her.

For this project students select a woman from history, do extensive research from multiple sources, then embody that person, presenting in character with substance, poise and eloquence. When Hamlin alumnae come back to visit they often cite their Women in History presentation as an enduring hallmark of their education.

Our students will present to their parents tomorrow tonight at the Century Club from 6-9 p.m.. This afternoon they will have the opportunity to partake in “Meeting of the Minds.” At this occasion they will speak as their influential women, discussing various topics with their peers, who are also in character. While sharing profound discourse, students enjoy delicious treats and sip drinks.

This year girls are representing the following women:

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Native San Franciscans Share Stories with Grade 2

Tuesday morning six San Francisco natives gathered to speak with Grade 2 students. Our girls are learning about the history of San Francisco as part of their social studies curriculum. Speakers shared fond memories and favorite San Francisco places, while also describing how various neighborhoods have both changed and stayed the same. Throughout the session our students asked every panelist thoughtful and specific questions to gain more information.

Below are a few highlights from each panelist:

Juan Oseguera (Hamlin Parent):

When I was a child the Bayview neighborhood demographics were mostly Black, Irish, and Italian. We had some of the best in the City, when it came down to Delis, Bakeries, Donut shops, Cafes, Soul food, Barbecue, Dinners, Drive-ins, and also one of the most Legendary Stadiums (Candlestick), which housed the Giants and the 49ers.

Elizabeth Dawson (Hamlin Parent):

I was born and raised in Presidio Heights. Two of my favorite shops were Dottie Doolittle, which is still around, and the Land of Counterpane, which was a wonderful children’s bookshop that all of the neighborhood kids went to. The owner of the bookshop, Marilyn Welch, used to invite many of the leading children’s authors and illustrators of that era to come to the shop and read to us.

Randy Choy:

We tended to stay in our own neighborhoods, and I stayed near the Marina District, and Chinatown mostly, though sometimes we would go downtown to go shopping.  I would take my little brother and sister on the cable car, and buy Pizza and ice cream at Woolworths, which was like a giant mall. In fact, we took the bus everywhere we went – we could get on any bus or the cable car for 5 cents!

Jarrel Phillips (Hamlin Hub Teacher):

I was born and raised in San Francisco in the Fillmore district… just 4 blocks from City Hall. My parents were also born and raised in San Francisco as well. My neighborhood was always busy. It was once known as the “Harlem of the West” because it was a thriving community for black people, arts and culture.

Jocelyn Combs (Hamlin Class of ’67):

I was born and raised in the Richmond District and lived 3 homes away from the San Francisco Presidio, which was my playground when I was a child. My parents met at the Presidio during the Second World War and are both buried there. The Presidio looks the same as it did 70 years ago; it is one of the only parts of San Francisco that is the same as it was.

Marina Chan (Hamlin Parent):

I was born in the same hospital that I gave birth to my children in San Francisco. I grew up in the Outer Richmond District, a couple of blocks away from the Cliff House/Sutro Baths/Land’s End/Ocean Beach area. I went to school in the Inner Richmond at a Catholic school named Star of the Sea (which is closing down next month). My parents owned a chain of photo and video stores in San Francisco.

 

Students Speak about Dolores Huerta and Cesar Chavez

On the morning of April 4 a group of poised lower school girls spoke about Dolores Huerta and Cesar Chavez. Below is what they shared.

Dolores Huerta’s birthday is coming up on April 10. Dolores’s mother taught her to always help others. Dolores went to school and became a teacher. Soon she met farmworkers’ children who would come to school cold and barefoot. They came to school when the farmers didn’t need them in the fields to pick crops. They were also too hungry to learn in school.

Cesar Chavez’s birthday was this past Sunday, March 31st. He was born in Arizona but had to move to California because his family lost their farm in Arizona because of unpaid taxes. The only work they could find was to become part of the California migrant farmworkers’ population. Cesar had to drop out of school. They never had an address because they had to move from farm to farm to pick lettuce or strawberries or grapes.

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Jan Micha Women in History Presentations

When you walk in the footsteps of greatness, you too can become great. For 30 years Grade 4 Hamlin students have taken the stage in front of their peers and parents, giving voice to inspiring women who came before them.

For this project students select a woman from history, do extensive research from multiple sources, then embody that person, presenting in character with substance, poise and eloquence. When Hamlin alumnae come back to visit they often cite their Women in History presentation as an enduring hallmark of their education. Our students presented to their peers yesterday, and will be in front of their parents tonight at the Century Club.

This year girls are representing the following women:

Suffragists & Abolitionists

Elizabeth Key Grinstead (1630)
Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815)
Victoria Woodhull (1838)

Educators, Writers, & Journalists

Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860)
Nellie Bly (1864)
Laura Ingalls Wilder (1867)
Julia Child (1912)
Dr. Temple Grandin (1947)

Women of Flight

Hazel Ying Lee (1912)
Maggie Gee (1923)
Dr. Sally Ride (1951)

Scientists & Mathematicians

Rachel Carson (1907)
Dian Fossey (1932)
Sylvia Earle (1935)
Grace Hopper (1906)
Katherine Johnson (1918)

Visual & Performing Artists

Julia Morgan (1872)
Lucille Ball (1911)
Audrey Hepburn (1929)
Maria Tallchief (1925)
Misty Copeland (1982)
Michaela DePrince (1995)

Athletes

Babe Didrikson Zaharias (1911)
Althea Gibson (1927)
Wilma Rudolph (1940)
Kit Deslauriers (1969)
Kristi Yamaguchi (1971)
Mia Hamm (1972)
Dominique Dawes (1976)
Michelle Kwan (1980)
Natalie Coughlin (1982)
Alex Morgan (1989)
Michelle Sung Wie (1989)
Bethany Hamilton (1990)
Aly Raisman (1994)

Entrepreneurs

Charlotte Parkhurst (1812)
Oprah Winfrey (1954)
Elizabeth Skidmore (1965)

Leaders

Deborah Sampson (1760)
Mary Bowser (1839)
Betty Reid Soskin (1921)
Diane Nash (1938)
Abigail Adams (1744)
Eleanor Roosevelt (1884)
Michelle Obama (1964)

Below is a video clip of Elizabeth Cady Stanton:

 

Tea With Inspiring Women

On May 10, Grade 4 students brought the lives of inspiring women to Hamlin, showcasing in-depth knowledge, accents, and costumes.  Students selected a woman from history, did extensive research from multiple sources, and then embodied that person at a table with tea and treats.

The conversation was guided by a series of thoughtful questions addressing everything from education to important life events, and even embarrassing moments. Girls sat in groups of four at tables. Guidelines for the discussion included: Have fun, See what you have in common with the other inspiring women, stay on topic, stay in the personality of your inspiring woman, react to what each other is saying.

Women from various eras were represented including (among others): Abigail Adams, Oprah Winfrey, Sylvia Earle, and Michelle Kwan.

Next week these students will have the opportunity to formally present as their women for our Jan Micha Women In History Program.

The video below shares a slice of the tea and conversation: