Tag Archives: San Francisco

Grade 5 Plays Harry Potter Tag

Our physical education department provides an endless supply of creative games to get our students exercising and having fun. This morning, Grade 5 students played Harry Potter Tag. Each student was a member of one of the Harry Potter houses (Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff). Through vigorous sprinting, girls attempted to successfully visit the other three houses without being tagged, thus earning a magic wand for their team. There was a magic portal and other special features in this wonderful game. Our girls love running outdoors, surrounded by the beauty of San Francisco and the Bay in the distance.

Noe Valley Girls Film Festival This Weekend

For the 4th year in a row, Hamlin students are leading the way by sharing excellent female-made films from around the world. There has always been a Hamlin presence in the Noe Valley Girls Film Festival, but this year even more students are avidly supporting this wonderful event. On Friday morning, Claire K. and Mollie W. spoke at our Lower School assembly, encouraging girls to attend the festival. Mollie W. (Grade 4) is a finalist in the competition with her film Lady Tiffin’s Travel SecretsThe film festival is this Saturday 9/7, 4pm at the Noe Valley Ministry.

The Noe Valley Girls Film Festival is very proud to announce that the Key Note Speakers for the 4th Annual Noe Valley Girls Film Festival will be some of the Pixar members from the amazing team behind the Oscar Winning Film Bao.

Bao is a 2018 animated Pixar film released with Incredibles 2 about a mother, suffering from empty nest syndrome, who receives an unexpected second chance at motherhood when she makes a steamed bun that comes to life. The film won the Oscar for the Best Animated Short Film

Speaking at the 2019 NVGFF will be the following movie makers from Pixar Studios: 
Becky Neiman-Cobb, Producer 
Lourdes Alba, Production Manager  
Lucy Laliberte, Production Technical Manager 
Connie Lee, Lead Coordinator 

The Noe Valley Girls Film Festival’s mission is to encourage young girls to make movies with the goals of creating a new generation of moviemakers, promoting Noe Valley, and having fun.

To learn more, please visit: http://www.nvgff.com/

Hamlin’s Public Speaking Guru: Tim Johnson

For the past two years, Tim Johnson (a Hamlin parent) has been bringing his public speaking expertise to both faculty members and students alike. The positive buzz around his work has been palpable. One administrator who took Johnson’s workshop states, “It was super helpful, not as scary as I thought it would be, and I think of what I learned in his workshop regularly!”

We recently had the opportunity to sit down with Mr. Johnson and learn more about who he is, and how he changes lives through teaching public speaking.

What led you to this work?

I got into theater when I was attending high school in North Carolina, that experience being on stage got me started with public speaking. Later, I worked for Enterprise for ten years in sales. I would meet with a CEO of a plumbing company who might be interested in using our cars; I figured out very quickly that those industry leaders are busy, and that I needed to say something that had immediate meaning and relevance. I learned a great deal about public speaking by giving numerous sales pitches.

What has your experience working with Hamlin students and faculty members been like?

The girls show so much respect for one another, they have a strong foundation of confidence that you can just feel when working with them. I’m so impressed with the camaraderie that is built by the cohort of faculty members taking my workshop. We start by filming a 1-minute speech, then we look at what was good and not so good, pointing out strengths and things that could be worked on. The work they do is like a combination of a trust fall and individual weightlifting, but there is so much growth from the experience.

You have done all of your Hamlin sessions on a pro-bono basis, tell us about that.

This has been my way of giving back to the school. Others are able to give big financial donations; I’m able to give my time and expertise.

Share one tip that anyone can use to become a more effective public speaker.

Practice, practice, practice. Practice out loud; time what you are going to say. Also, don’t forget that people will remember the way you make them feel more than anything specific that you say.

To connect with Tim Johnson, feel free to email him at:   tim@apjconsult.com

Grade 4 Visits California Pioneer Museum

Grade 4 recently visited Her Side of the Story: Tales of Pioneer Women, the newest exhibit at the Society of California Pioneers.

Among the treasures in The Society of California Pioneers archives are rare, first person narratives by pioneer women. After uniting to ensure that future generations could recognize, and would acknowledge, the role women played in the formation of the state, The Association of Pioneer Women of California collected and preserved the experiences of its members. Bound in an unpublished, handwritten book, their remarkable stories are the foundation of this museum exhibition and online resource for teachers.

Grade 4 Social Studies curriculum delves into American History and Geography, Westward Expansion, and History from the Female Perspective, making the excursion a wonderful fit with our studies.

To learn more about the exhibit, please visit: https://www.californiapioneers.org/museum/

Grade 8 Visits Preschoolers in the Mission District

On May 30, Hamlin Grade 8 students visited Holy Family Day Home in the Mission, a nonprofit organization that we have worked with for the past 15 years. The visit was led by our middle school Spanish department.

Holy Family Day Home’s goal is to provide affordable, high quality, early childhood education and family support services in a stable and nurturing environment, thereby providing the children of working families skills and hope for lifelong development.  

Hamlin students began the morning by singing the song Cada Semilla to the preschoolers and playing Simon Dice, all in Spanish. Our students were then paired up with different children to read books. Our girls brought their very own self-created books written in Spanish with beautiful handmade illustrations. After sharing these fantastic stories, everyone went outside to play. The joy and energy between the younger and older students was palpable.

After playtime, Hamlin students heard more about program specifics from members of Holy Family Day Home’s leadership team. They learned about the food pantry that provides nourishment for families in need, and the emphasis placed on seamlessly integrating homeless and non-homeless students into classrooms. This experience provided a wonderful opportunity for our girls to serve the greater San Francisco community. Our students were invited to continue volunteering at the Holy Family Day Home during their high school years.

To learn more about Holy Family Day Home, please visit: https://holyfamilydayhome.org/

Native San Franciscans Share Stories with Grade 2

Tuesday morning six San Francisco natives gathered to speak with Grade 2 students. Our girls are learning about the history of San Francisco as part of their social studies curriculum. Speakers shared fond memories and favorite San Francisco places, while also describing how various neighborhoods have both changed and stayed the same. Throughout the session our students asked every panelist thoughtful and specific questions to gain more information.

Below are a few highlights from each panelist:

Juan Oseguera (Hamlin Parent):

When I was a child the Bayview neighborhood demographics were mostly Black, Irish, and Italian. We had some of the best in the City, when it came down to Delis, Bakeries, Donut shops, Cafes, Soul food, Barbecue, Dinners, Drive-ins, and also one of the most Legendary Stadiums (Candlestick), which housed the Giants and the 49ers.

Elizabeth Dawson (Hamlin Parent):

I was born and raised in Presidio Heights. Two of my favorite shops were Dottie Doolittle, which is still around, and the Land of Counterpane, which was a wonderful children’s bookshop that all of the neighborhood kids went to. The owner of the bookshop, Marilyn Welch, used to invite many of the leading children’s authors and illustrators of that era to come to the shop and read to us.

Randy Choy:

We tended to stay in our own neighborhoods, and I stayed near the Marina District, and Chinatown mostly, though sometimes we would go downtown to go shopping.  I would take my little brother and sister on the cable car, and buy Pizza and ice cream at Woolworths, which was like a giant mall. In fact, we took the bus everywhere we went – we could get on any bus or the cable car for 5 cents!

Jarrel Phillips (Hamlin Hub Teacher):

I was born and raised in San Francisco in the Fillmore district… just 4 blocks from City Hall. My parents were also born and raised in San Francisco as well. My neighborhood was always busy. It was once known as the “Harlem of the West” because it was a thriving community for black people, arts and culture.

Jocelyn Combs (Hamlin Class of ’67):

I was born and raised in the Richmond District and lived 3 homes away from the San Francisco Presidio, which was my playground when I was a child. My parents met at the Presidio during the Second World War and are both buried there. The Presidio looks the same as it did 70 years ago; it is one of the only parts of San Francisco that is the same as it was.

Marina Chan (Hamlin Parent):

I was born in the same hospital that I gave birth to my children in San Francisco. I grew up in the Outer Richmond District, a couple of blocks away from the Cliff House/Sutro Baths/Land’s End/Ocean Beach area. I went to school in the Inner Richmond at a Catholic school named Star of the Sea (which is closing down next month). My parents owned a chain of photo and video stores in San Francisco.

 

Hamlin Students Lead 4th Annual Film Festival

For the 4th year in a row, Hamlin students Caitlin and Maggie are leading the initiative to share great female-made films from around the world. There has always been a Hamlin presence in the Noe Valley Girls Film Festival, but this year even more students are avidly supporting this wonderful event.

The Noe Valley Girls Film Festival’s mission is to encourage young girls to make movies with the goals of creating a new generation of moviemakers, promoting Noe Valley, and having fun.  With today’s technology, anyone can learn to make a movie. The NVGFF is seeking short film submissions made by girls anywhere in the world in two age groups (ages 11-15 and age 10 and under).  Submissions are due by August 1, 2019, and the finalists are expected to be announced in late-August, 2019. The festival will be held at 4:00 pm on September 7, 2019, at the Noe Valley Ministry in Noe Valley, San Francisco, CA.  At the festival, we expect to show the top submissions, have a well-known local filmmaker present awards to the winners, and have a raffle.

To learn more, please visit: http://www.nvgff.com/

Camping in the Presidio with Grade 3

This week, students in Grade 3 explored and camped in the rustic nature of the Presidio.

Perched on​​ four wooded acres above Baker Beach at the Presidio’s highest point, Rob Hill is the only group campground in San Francisco. Here, you can see ​the lights of Sutro Tower, smell the ocean, and hear the owls in their Cypress roosts. It’s easy to see why people have been sleeping under the stars – fog-shrouded as they may be at times – here for generations, beginning with the Ohlone, the first inhabitants of this area.

Some highlights included: 

-Using teamwork to set up tents

-Creating artwork using objects found in nature

-Making and eating s’mores

-Going on hikes

-Spending time at the beach

-Bonding with friends

To learn more about camping at Rob Hill, please visit: https://www.presidio.gov/places/rob-hill-campground

 

Bringing Altruism to San Francisco in Grade 7

On Tuesday, Grade 7 students left campus to volunteer with the nonprofits Glide, Lava Mae, and City Hope. This was the final of three grade-wide service days partnering with multiple nonprofits. At the end of the day each group participated in reflective work which allowed students to process their profound experiences.

The day was designed to help our students explore as they prepare for their Rise to the Challenge (RTC) capstone project work (taking place in May). For RTC, girls will work to identify challenges they feel passionate about, then develop action plans to address those challenges, using their knowledge, resources, and collaborative talents. Students will have the opportunity to choose their own topics, do in-depth research, then share their findings, providing short and long-term solutions to various local and global problems.

Today’s work supported three organizations. Their missions are:

Glide:

Glide is a radically inclusive, just and loving community mobilized to alleviate suffering and break the cycles of poverty and marginalization.

Lava Mae: 

Lava Mae brings critical services to the streets- delivered with an unexpected level of care we call “Radical Hospitality”-where people experiencing homelessness need them most. 

City Hope:

Our mission is to empower our neighbors in the Tenderloin to establish stable, healthy lives. We provide a trusted gathering place and creatively offer as many elements of home as possible for our neighbors on the streets.

https://www.glide.org/

https://lavamae.org/

https://www.cityhopesf.org/

 

Exploring Community in Grade 1

Grade 1 students have spent much of their school year exploring San Francisco and the people who live in our city. Students began by asking, how can we demonstrate good citizenship in our local community? Girls took walks around the Hamlin neighborhood in order to: make observations, think about the needs of a community, and speak with people who live and work nearby. 1st graders looked at different kinds of maps, made their own maps, and followed maps on the neighborhood walks. The girls also had an opportunity to explore their own home neighborhoods and teach their peers about what they discovered through creating poster boards with photos.

On April 9, the project culminated with girls showing their 3 dimensional map of the local neighborhood, complete with QR codes, which allowed visitors to learn more via their mobile phones.