Tag Archives: art

Spanish Students Interpret Artwork

Grade 7 Hamlin Spanish students recently created a museum of Hispanic artists. Girls researched the lives of various artists and then wrote about one work of art and created a short biography about the life of their artist, employing art history vocabulary along with the use of the past tense. As part of the interdisciplinary Spanish and Art project, students role-played as Hispanic artists, interviewing each other about what inspired and defined their artwork. For the creative part of the project, students had the freedom to write a poem, take a photograph or paint a work of art similar to the original piece.

Above, Ava’s painting is on the left and Noé Canjura’s is on the right.

More of these beautiful art pieces are on display in the East Dining Room.

Science Students Turn Tissue into Art

Students in Grade 7 have been studying tissue in science. They examined slides for the following tissue types: epithelial, muscle, connective, and nervous. As part of an interdisciplinary project, students selected one slide, then created a painting based on what they observed.

The above painting is titled Ocean of Spiders. The tissue type is nervous. These cells are located in the brain. The tissue reminded the artist of raindrops and spiders. The artist characterized the tissue this way:

It is dyed with silver. The neuron has a circular core that has one long branch that sends messages, and a lot of tiny branches that receive messages.

These fascinating paintings are currently on display in front of our middle school science classrooms.

 

Hamlin Students Visit the SFMOMA

On Thursday, students in Grade 6 had the opportunity to visit the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and see the Magritte exhibit.

René François Ghislain Magritte was a Belgian surrealist artist. He became well known for creating a number of witty and thought-provoking images. Often depicting ordinary objects in an unusual context, his work is known for challenging observers’ preconditioned perceptions of reality.

Hamlin art teacher, Ms. Feldman put together an interactive Keynote that allowed our students to engage in profound learning as they experienced the artwork.

As part of the Keynote tour (with their iPads), girls did the following (among other activities):

Discuss with your partner:

-Explore the works in this room. What emotions are being expressed? Do you think that art needs to express emotions? Whose emotions does art express?

-Choose one piece of artwork to talk about. What do you think will happen next in this piece?

-With your partner, find a piece of art in this room to talk about and answer these questions: What is the story that you see in this work of art? What do you see in the work that tells you it is about this story?

To learn more about the exhibit, please visit: https://www.sfmoma.org/exhibitions-events/

 

 

Drew Daywalt and Scott Campbell Visit Hamlin

On Tuesday, Drew Daywalt and Scott Campbell spoke with lower school students.

Drew Daywalt is an award-winning, #1 New York Times bestselling children’s author whose books include The Day the Crayons Quit, The Day the Crayons Came Home, and The Legend of Rock Paper Scissors.

Scott Campbell creates paintings, illustrations, comics, kid’s books and video games. He has published numerous comics and created paintings that have appeared in galleries and publications around the world.

Mr. Daywalt and Mr. Campbell shared a humor-filled presentation and talked about their creative process. When developing the character Sleepy (from Sleepy, the Goodnight Buddy), the two spoke on the phone, discussing various ideas for the illustration. Mr. Campbell then sketched 40-50 different versions of Sleepy before coming up with the final depiction. On the writing side, Mr. Daywalt spent a month editing the story until he was very happy with the narrative. Mr. Daywalt also shared that the main character in Sleepy was modeled after his 9-year old son.

The two men read Sleepy to the girls and demonstrated how to do a couple of drawings from the book. The assembly was a tremendous hit, our students were cheering and very excited to get a behind the scenes look at how books are created.

To learn more about Mr. Daywalt and Mr. Campbell, please visit: https://www.amazon.com/Drew-Daywalt/e/B00DW25OSQ and https://www.scottc.com/

 

 

A Hamlin Tradition: Students Create Artistic Sweatshirts

Going into our 155th year, The Hamlin School has a rich array of time honored traditions. For more than ten years, Grade 7 students have been getting together in the spring to design their very own personalized hoodie sweatshirt to be worn during their last year at Hamlin. The names of every Grade 8 girl appear on the back of the sweatshirt.

During the creation process, girls submit designs for the sweatshirt that are both original and found through online sources. The most popular ideas are then put to a class vote.

Eliza and Catherine share more about this year’s sweatshirt:

We chose the paper airplane and heart design because we liked the symbolism. As Grade 8 students we are “leading with love,” and will be “leaving Hamlin with love.”

We have been looking forward to wearing our sweatshirt since we were in 5th grade, it is a special privilege that we have earned.

The mother of a Hamlin graduate elaborates:

My daughter wore her Grade 8 sweatshirt throughout high school, it was a source of pride and ongoing connectedness for her.

 

 

Claire Garlington brings STEM Portraits to Hamlin

Last week Claire Garlington, (a senior at the Bay School, attending UCSD next year for chemical engineering) spoke with our students at middle school assembly. Ms. Garlington recently painted four influential women from various STEM fields. Ms. Garlington is passionate about creating greater awareness about women in STEM; past, present, and future.

The portraits of Lise Meitner (Physics), Mae Jemison (NASA), Maryam Mirzakhani (Math), Cher Wang (Technology) will be on display in Stanwood Hall until June 1st.

Designing Record Album Covers

Recently, grade 4 artists had the opportunity to design their own original artwork for record album covers. The students picked a record title out of a hat and were not allowed to look at the artwork of the real album. The girls were then challenged to design their own cover using the title. During the activity students listened to songs from each album, learning some popular music history along the way.

Building A Story Quilt

Students in Ms. Feldman’s art class are creating story quilts inspired by the work of artist Faith Ringgold.

Faith Ringgold, is a painter, writer, speaker, mixed media sculptor and performance artist who lives and works in Englewood, New Jersey. Ms. Ringgold is professor emeritus at the University of California, San Diego where she taught art from 1987 until 2002. Professor Ringgold is the recipient of more than 75 awards including 22 Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts Degrees. 

Ms. Feldman is personally enriched by Ms. Ringgold’s art. She’s an African American woman from Harlem, she was sick as a youngster, I’m inspired by her backstory. She creates art based on who she is, I want students to look at who they are.

The students wrote briefly about two memories, then chose one to sketch out in pencil. Using the sketch, students create a layered visual image from sewed and embroidered felt pieces.

Here is the draft for the work seen above.

These pieces will be displayed on the 1st floor of Stanwood in the coming weeks.

You can watch a brief interview with Faith Ringgold here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Comf9SetjRA&feature=youtu.be

 

Shading Value Project by Maggie Jo Feldman

Objectives:

  • Identify a range of value in a work of art
  • Create an abstract drawing using a range of values
  • Apply knowledge of value in different contexts
  • Demonstrate understanding of the use of different media
  • Design a Keynote presentation

Process:

Students began this unit on value by first watching a PowerPoint and discussing how using a range of light and dark shading contributes to mood, contrast, and texture in works of art. They designed a value scale in their sketchbooks that showed a range of shading from dark to light.

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Applying the shading technique, students produced an abstract value drawing.

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In order to further enhance their understanding of the aesthetic effects of shading and develop visual awareness, students integrated art and technology to create a Keynote project using their iPads. Their Keynote presentation included a black and white photograph in which areas of light and dark were identified using their value scale.

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Here are the steps the students followed to create their project in Keynote:

  1. Students photographed their value scales. Crop and save in PS Express
  2. They searched a color image on the Internet.
  3. In PS Express, they switched the color image to black and white
  4. They went to Keynote and inserted their value scale and image
  5. They identified on the image the range of values using black or white text where appropriate
  6. They added their names
  7. Students chose to make their piece horizontal or vertical and where to place their name
  8. They printed the project

Follow up formative assessment questions:

  1. Was this helpful in furthering your understanding about values in art?
    Answer: majority “thumbs up”
  1. Did you have fun doing this project?
    Answer: unanimous “thumbs up”
  1. What did you learn that was new to you on the iPad?
    Answer: PS Express to crop and adjust color, using different colors text in Keynote