Category Archives: Art

Animal Collage Artwork

Grade 5 students recently completed colorful collages showcasing animals from across the United States. Abby created a beautiful grey fox.

She shares this reflection about her artistic process:

Overall, I think I had a good experience making this collage. It was a little hard to find the right colors that I needed. What I did to get through the challenge was improvise to find a solution that worked even though it took a long time. The part of the process that I enjoyed the most was collaborating with my friends and finding a way to put the scraps onto my picture. I like the way my piece came out because I am not naturally talented at collaging, but I still was able to do this successfully. The part of the artistic process that surprised me the most was that we spent so long drawing our animals. Now that I look back at it, I think it was very important that we spent so long drawing because we need to know all of the spacing and color details.

Cave Drawing in Kindergarten

The Chauvet and Lascaux Caves in France aren’t the only places to see beautiful drawings of animals. Next week kindergarteners will be creating their own artwork inside of the Lascaux Cave in McKinne Lounge.

In preparation for this undertaking, students enjoyed the picture book The First Drawing, and pondered the importance of animals to early humans in prehistoric Europe. Our girls will explore the magic of the cave using chalk and special lights to make their depictions. Be sure to stop by for a visit inside!

Scratchboard Art

Grade 7 Elective Art recently made beautiful feather images using a technique called scratchboard.

Scratchboard is made by using a sharp tool to scratch off dark ink to reveal a white or colored layer beneath. Unlike many drawing media, where the artist adds in the mid-tones and shadows, with scratchboard the artist is working by adding in the highlights.

Scratchboard was originally invented for the purpose of reproduction in printing. It has been used for over a century reproducing images for books, magazines, newspapers, and in advertising.

Spring Flowers Bloom in Lower School

Spring has indeed sprung in Lower School. McKinne lounge is bursting with color, flowers big and small, butterflies too.

Grade 4 made all the large flowers, and first and second grades helped out with some smaller ones. Kindergarteners made the papier mâché butterflies.

Art teacher Andy Witrak shares:

“Our theme this year was garden, but we just loosely adhered to that and created a flower wall.”

Who Are You? Self-Portraits with Words and Colorful Hair

Grade 5 art students created unique self-portraits with colorful hair comprised of descriptive words. The language of the hair served to showcase the personalities of each girl.

The project had 5 key steps:

1) Take a photograph of yourself.

2) Trace the photograph in Keynote. Delete the photograph and leave the tracing. Print out the traced image.

3) Use the technique of scale and proportion to create a grid on both the traced image and on the paper.

4) Create a contour line drawing using correct face proportions.

5) Add descriptive words about yourself to the hair.

Grade 5 Recreates Gary Larson Cartoons

Recently, Grade 5 students worked to enlarge and recreate an image by Gary Larson using the grid method. They made a grid on a small image and on a large piece of paper. Students then copied and enlarged the original image.

The grid method is used to create accurate proportions. Proportion is the relationship of two or more elements in a design and how they compare with one another. Using a grid is a popular way to ensure that the proportions and layout of a drawing are correct. It is particularly useful when accuracy is important.

Gary Larson is an American cartoonist. He is the creator of The Far Side, a single-panel cartoon series that was syndicated internationally to over 1,900 newspapers for fifteen years. The series ended with Larson’s retirement on January 1, 1995.

Hamlin Students Visit the SFMOMA

On Thursday, students in Grade 6 had the opportunity to visit the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and see the Magritte exhibit.

René François Ghislain Magritte was a Belgian surrealist artist. He became well known for creating a number of witty and thought-provoking images. Often depicting ordinary objects in an unusual context, his work is known for challenging observers’ preconditioned perceptions of reality.

Hamlin art teacher, Ms. Feldman put together an interactive Keynote that allowed our students to engage in profound learning as they experienced the artwork.

As part of the Keynote tour (with their iPads), girls did the following (among other activities):

Discuss with your partner:

-Explore the works in this room. What emotions are being expressed? Do you think that art needs to express emotions? Whose emotions does art express?

-Choose one piece of artwork to talk about. What do you think will happen next in this piece?

-With your partner, find a piece of art in this room to talk about and answer these questions: What is the story that you see in this work of art? What do you see in the work that tells you it is about this story?

To learn more about the exhibit, please visit: https://www.sfmoma.org/exhibitions-events/

 

 

Artists Explore Keith Haring’s World

Recently, lower school art students worked diligently and with gusto to fill McKinne Lounge with images inspired by Keith Haring.

Grade 2 artists created the mural shown in the photo above. Students learned about Keith Haring’s large-scale paintings on walls, floors, ceilings, and even on expansive buildings. Each Grade 2 artist created a symbol to draw on the wall, then filled the spaces in between to create a continuous drawing, just like Keith Haring did. Students in different lower school grades added their artwork to cover all the other McKinne walls with vibrant Haring-like imagery.

Keith Haring was born on May 4, 1958 in Reading, Pennsylvania. He discovered a love for drawing at an early age, learning basic cartooning skills from his father who drew comics as a hobby. Like many children of his generation, Haring was an admirer of the popular animation of Walt Disney, Dr. Seuss, and Looney Tunes.

Grade 4 artists share about the project:

I really liked the project; it was a fun way to start off the year.

I like Keith Haring; he is the first artist I have really been able to identify with. 

I love his colorful cartoon and graffiti style, it is contemporary and fun to imitate.

To learn more about Keith Haring, please visit: http://www.haring.com/

 

Hamlin Turns Old Uniforms Into Art

Over the years, Ms. Ching has supervised the lost and found bins. Among the many items discovered in the bins are Hamlin uniforms. Periodically these old uniforms are shredded in order to make space for other things. As students learn to recycle, reuse and repurpose to help save the planet, it became evident that these abandoned Hamlin uniforms could be turned into something beautiful and artistic. Grade 7 art students selected one of these middies and created a unique self-portrait using symbols, words, and images. Designs were embroidered on the shirts, giving new life to these forgotten articles of clothing.

Thank you, Ms. Ching for your support of this art project and for your vigilance in finding homes for all the lost and found items.

Building A Butterfly

Guest post from a Grade 5 Hamlin School student writing about her recent art project:

While I was researching, I discovered many interesting facts about the monarch butterfly. I learned that they can travel up to 3,000 miles while migrating, they can’t fly in the rain because their wings will get too heavy, so they have to wait the rain out. Also, I learned that they are called king of butterflies, hence the name monarch. Additionally, I learned that caterpillars gain about 2,700 times their original weight, and monarch butterflies don’t have lungs, they breathe through their scales!

I loved seeing this project in different stages. One challenge that I had was that the shapes of my creature were specific and detailed, so it was hard fitting the pieces into the collage. To help me with this problem, I used the scissors to make the shapes. Although this was challenging, I enjoyed putting the pieces on because it was really cool to see the colors and contrast come together. One thing that I was surprised about was how easily you could see the butterfly on my collage. I was pleased about how it came out because it looked pretty realistic and the colors looked really nice together.