Hamlin 7th Graders to Launch Experiments into Space

Cubes in Space™ a program by idoodledu inc., in collaboration with NASA’s Langley Research Center, NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility and Colorado Space Grant Consortium, offers global design competitions for students 11-18 years of age to develop STEAM-based experiments for launch into space.

Used in formal or informal learning environments, students and educators are exposed to engaging online content and activities in preparation for the design and development of an experiment to be integrated into a small cube. Throughout the experience, students develop key 21st century skills; communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity.

Since 2014, Cubes in Space has flown nearly 400 experiments representing 1500 educators and over 20,000 students from 57 different countries. This year nearly 600 educators and thousands of students from 39 countries participated and proposed experiments for placement on a NASA sounding rocket or high-altitude scientific balloon mission.  A total of 160 experiments were selected and were designed by students from Australia, Austria, Canada, Colombia, Ecuador, India, Mexico, Serbia, the United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, the and the United States of America.

The experiments will be launched via sounding rocket in late June 2017 from NASA Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia or by high-altitude scientific balloon in late summer 2017 from NASA’s Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Ft. Sumner, New Mexico.

The following Hamlin student experiments will be launched this summer:

Maya W. and Sofia I. “Graphene Filament Voltage in Stratosphere versus on Earth”
They are looking at using a special carbon 3-D printing filament that is electrically conductive. The girls want to test the affects of the filament in space to see if it could be used as an electrical wire on Mars for possible colonization, since Mars has a lot of carbon as a building material source.

Della W. and Annie S. “How do high levels of UV-A/UV-B rays affect the efficiency of protective sunglass lenses?” They are looking at how polarized and regular sunglasses protect against UV rays with the higher UV intensity of space. Higher intensities are seen in different areas of the Earth, day to day while flying in an airplane and often from human interaction or after a global event such as a tsunami. Pollution or a tsunami can release toxins into the air that affect ozone protection and increase the UV levels.

Special thanks to Hamlin teacher Melissa Alfred, for her guidance with this important work.

For more information about Cubes in Space, please visit: http://www.cubesinspace.com/

 

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